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  #1  
Old 22 Sep 2011, 11:07
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Default Basic Guide to Choose Racquet for Beginner

Underlying Principles

The following guidance in this thread is purely theoretical, and it shall always subject to the following salient considerations:
1. Personal preference is the utmost important issue
2. Game play characteristic is the second important issue
3. Last but not least… your personal budget

Kindly note that I ain’t expert in badminton, and just recently bought my personal racquet.

All Statements / tips / hints contained in this thread are retrieved and/or gathered from various websites.

Further query or discussion under this thread shall require assistance from other members in this forum.


2011 Yonex Racquet Chart







Last edited by Sulistyomo; 22 Sep 2011 at 11:16.
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  #2  
Old 22 Sep 2011, 11:07
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1. KELENTURAN GAGANG (STIFFNESS OF SHAFT)

A. Extra Flexible, Flexible OR Medium
Pemindahan sebagian tenaga yang berpusat pada pergelangan tangan. Pemusatan energi untuk tungkai yang fleksibel saat raket diayun memberikan daya tolak yang lebih besar saat shuttlecock menyentuh raket. Jenis ini sangat baik untuk pertahanan / untuk mengontrol gaya permainan.

B. Stiff (Limited Flexibility)
Pemindahan tenaga yang memungkinkan dari pergelangan tangan. Tangkai jenis ini sangat dianjurkan untuk teknik permainan bertahan maupun permainan serangan.

C. Extra Stiff (Minimum Flexibility)
Pemindahan tenaga secara maksimum yang berpusat pada pergelangan tangan. Gerakan tangkai raket yang minimalis memberikan ketepatan yang lebih baik atas penempatan shuttlecock. Raket dengan tangkai jenis ini sangat ideal untuk teknik permainan serangan seperti smashing/net kill.


Informasi Tambahan
If you have good strength and fast racket swing speed, get a racket with a stiffer shaft, in order to get the maximum power transferred to your shots.
If your swing speed is slow, get a racket with a more flexible shaft to utilize the ‘shaft bending’ to get better shot power.

Racket shaft reaction when hitting the shuttlecock
At the split second when your racket starts to hit the shuttlecock, the racket shaft will bend and then unleash forward towards the end of the impact.

If you have good strength or fast swing speed, a stiff racket shaft will help you in this case because by the end of impact of hitting shuttlecock, the racket shaft would have unbend/straighten just in time.
This is because a stiff racket shaft will not bend much and since your swing speed is fast as well, then both elements will be in synchronization.
This will transform to maximum power being transferred from your swing to the shuttlecock.
If you use a flexible shaft instead, at the end of impact of hitting the shuttlecock, the racket shaft hasn’t unbent / straightens completely and this causes lost of power.

On the contrary, if you have lower strength or slow swing speed, a flexible racket will help you because towards the end of point of impact of hitting the shuttlecock, the racket shaft would have unbend / straighten just in time, hence giving you the best power to your shot.
If you use a stiffer shaft instead, the racket shaft would have unbend / straighten before the end of impact to the shuttlecock, causing loss of power.
A flexible shaft also helps increasing the power of the shot in this scenario because the ‘natural bending capability’ of the shaft acts like a slingshot, generating additional power to the shot, in addition to your racket swing.



FLEXIBLE SHAFT

Repulsion : Good
A flexible shaft offers good repulsion of the shuttlecock in a badminton swing. This is because a flexible shaft bends slightly towards the back and stores energy during your swing motion.
As the shuttle comes into contact with the string bed of the racket, the stored energy will be released and then transferred to the shuttlecock. Therefore holder of the racket does not have to exert too much strength for badminton shots such as badminton clears from baseline to baseline.

Shuttlecock Placement: Less Accurate
Since the shaft of the racket is flexible and easily bent, you'll find it slightly difficult to do perfect shot placement. As the shuttle lands on the string bed of the racket, repulsion will cause the head of the racket to vibrate, leading to uncertainty in the flight direction of the shuttlecock.
Therefore it's difficult to control where you want the shuttlecock to land with a flexible shaft.

Suitable for: Stroke players, defensive players, defending smashes.
Stroke players are also defensive players. Their style of playing is more towards performing a series of badminton lobs and badminton drop shots. They smash ONLY when they have a clear chance. Their winning strategy is to force their players into errors via long rallies.
Flexible shaft rackets require less strength to generate power. Therefore, stroke/defensive players do not have to worry about exerting much strength in their swing motion when doing clears and drop shots.
Flexible rackets also good for defending against smashes. When defending powerful smashes, a soft touch with a flexible racket is able to return the shuttle to the opponent easily (repulsion).

Disadvantage
Although flexible rackets offer good power (repulsion), it lacks the speed in returning shots.
As the shuttle lands on the string bed, repulsion takes place (the shaft will bend backwards then forward before the shuttle is returned). In other words, the shuttle stays on the string bed for a longer period of time before it's returned.



STIFF SHAFT

Repulsion: Little or None
A stiff shaft offers little or no repulsion. The shuttle will bounce off immediately after it comes into contact with the string bed of the racket.
With less repulsion, shots are less powerful. This means that the holder of the badminton racket will have to swing harder in order to generate more power.

Shuttlecock Placement: Accurate
A stiff shaft is excellent for accurate shuttlecock placement.
A stiff racket does not bend much. When the shuttle hits the string bed of the racket, it will NOT vibrate and cause uncertainty to the flight direction of the shuttlecock.

Suitable for: Fast Attacks, Deceptions, Net kill
Badminton is a game of speed. Flexible shafts offer you power but lack the speed in executing a badminton shot. With a stiff shaft, you are sacrificing power for speed in returning the shuttle.
Since the shuttle bounces off the string bed of a stiff racket immediately, the shuttle will be returned FAST. With a stiff racket head, it's more about using your wrist power rather than a swing motion. The power of your wrist will be completely transferred to the shuttle.
Advanced badminton skills such as fast attacks (overhead smash) and deceptions require fast executions and are usually performed via a quick flick of your wrist.

Disadvantage: Requires stronger swings or quick wrist action
In order to maximize your performance with a stiff racket, you'll need to have good technique for stroking to generate sufficient strength in your swing motion.
With a stiff racket, the strength in your swing motion will not be fully transferred to the shuttle when it hits the string bed (no repulsion).
Besides, using stiff rackets are more about utilizing your wrist action to produce speed and power. Unlike a swing motion, power from the flick of your wrist will be fully transferred to the shuttle.
Therefore, you must possess good technique for badminton strokes and able to make use of your wrist action for power and better performance.



NOTE: Playing with a racket with stiffness which is too high for you will also cause vibration to your hand and arm upon hitting the shuttlecock. When this prolongs for a long time, this may cause injury to your hand and arm. So please choose a racket shaft stiffness which is suitable for you.

Last edited by Sulistyomo; 22 Sep 2011 at 11:20. Reason: All About Shaft
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  #3  
Old 22 Sep 2011, 11:08
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2. BENTUK / FRAME RAKET

a. Conventional - Berbentuk Oval Standar.
Kepala raket yang berbentuk Oval cocok untuk pemain dengan power tinggi, sebab bentuk ini membantu konsentrasi kekuatan pada raket.

b. Isometric - Berbentuk cenderung Persegi (Square Head).
Raket berbentuk Isometrik/Persegi membantu jangkauan karena permukaan yang lebih lebar.


Informasi Tambahan
An isometric rackets gives you a larger sweet spot, hence making it easier for you to hit a shot efficiently. An oval headed racket has a smaller sweet spot but if the sweet spot is hit, it gives you a slightly more concentrated power.

Isometric rackets technology has matured so much that most of the rackets nowadays are of isometric head type, except for rackets such as Yonex Carbonex series. Take note though that different isometric rackets might have different head size, i.e. some are wider and some are narrower (although the difference may not be too obvious). A larger racket head will widen the sweet spot relatively, but it adds weight to the racket though.

A sweet spot is the area of the racket string bed that produces the most power, the best sound & feeling, and the least vibration when you hit on it. It is normally located between around the center of the string bed, but not directly in the middle though. If you can hit the shuttle in the middle of the racket you will be hitting the sweet spot all the time. With an enlarged sweet spot you will have more chance of getting power from slightly mishit shots.

Normally an isometric racket has a larger sweet spot compared to an oval-head racket. Reducing the string tension and getting a racket with a more flexible (less stiff) shaft will also significantly widen the sweet spot. There is a trade off to this though, please refer to shaft stiffness and string tension section for more details on this.

Last edited by Sulistyomo; 22 Sep 2011 at 11:23. Reason: All About Frame
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Old 22 Sep 2011, 11:08
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3. BOBOT/WEIGHT RAKET
a. Yonex U (95-99g)
b. Yonex 2U (90-94g)
c. Yonex 3U (85-89g)
d. Yonex 4U (80-84g)
e. Yonex 5U (75-79g)

Informasi Tambahan
More weight will generally give you more power at the expense of maneuverability.
A heavier racquet will be harder to swing through the air, but it will provide more stability.
A lighter racket will offer more swing speed and maneuverability, at the cost of power & stability.

If you want to hit just hard enough to win rallies OR points without getting tired easily so you can get a consistent performance, then using a lighter racquets will be better.
If you aim to break the record for the hardest and fastest smash in your community, then you can consider the heavier racquet.

Be aware that this is the weight before you add the strings and your grip.
All advertised weights are for the frame only (Before Stringing).
Please note that a racket will be heavier after you string it (including adding replacement grip).


Racket Weight
A heavier racket will give you better power and it also vibrates less when you hit the shuttlecock. Heavier racket accumulates more momentum during your badminton swing, hence giving you more power. Furthermore, it also provides more stability and durability for higher string tensions.

The downside is that a heavier badminton racket is harder to control. It's also less comfortable handling a heavy racket. A heavier racket obviously reduces the maneuverability of the racket. Last but not least, a heavier racket would require better stamina of its user.

On the contrary, a lighter racket shall provide you with better maneuverability, but it shall produce lesser power and cause more vibration when you hit shuttlecock. Please note, the manufacturer usually determines lower level of string tensions for lighter racket.

NOTE: Be careful not to get a racket heavier than what you could handle, as it might increase the potency of injury to your wrist, hand, and arm.

Last edited by Sulistyomo; 22 Sep 2011 at 11:25. Reason: All About Weight
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Old 22 Sep 2011, 11:09
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4. LENGTH / PANJANG TOTAL (FRAME TIP – HANDLE END)
a. Standard (665mm / 26.0 inches)
b. Long (675mm / 26.5 inches).

Informasi Tambahan
The length of a badminton racket is measured from the bottom of the racket handle/grip to the tip of the racket head.
A typical racket length is between 665m to 675mm, and should not exceed 680mm. A racket with length between 674mm to 680mm is sometimes labeled as 'Extra Long' racket, because a lot of rackets are around 665-670mm in length.

A longer racket will give you better power compared to a shorter racket. The reason for this is due to the law of physics, analogous to when you are sweeping floor with a broom. You definitely use less strength with a long broom, compared to a shorter one.

HOWEVER a longer racket will hurt the maneuverability of the racket a little. To experience this, try holding a racket closer to the racket cone (the triangle intersection where the grip meets the racket shaft) and flick the racket around. Then try repeating this by holding the racket far lower to the grip, to simulate a longer racket. You will feel that it’s harder to flick the racket this time.

Last edited by Sulistyomo; 22 Sep 2011 at 11:26. Reason: All About Length
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Old 22 Sep 2011, 11:09
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5. UKURAN/SIZE GRIP
a. Yonex G2 – 4.00 inches
b. Yonex G3 – 3.75 inches
c. Yonex G4 – 3.50 inches
d. Yonex G5 – 3.25 inches
e. Yonex G6 – 3.00 inches


Informasi Tambahan
A Smaller Grip gives you more control while a Bigger Grip gives you more power.
But what small grip and big grip means depend solely on the player's hand size.

Generally, Attacking Players prefer bigger grips as they need to hold the racquet more tightly to generate power. Alternatively, Defensive Players who like to rally and make use of deception usually use a smaller grip, which allows them turn the racquet in their hands more easily.


Power Play: Focus on Powerful Shots
Players who opt for power usually go for strong consecutive attacks (smash / jump smash). Their strategy is to force their opponents to return a weak shot & then get the chance to "play the win".
Attacking players hold their racket handles tightly in order to generate power for strong smashes. Therefore, a THICKER grip handle will be suitable for these types of players.


Control Play: Focus on Accuracy and Technique
Players who prefer to engage in various badminton skills are called stroke players/rally players. Their winning strategy is to force their opponents into long rallies by doing badminton clears and badminton drops.
A THINNER grip handle will be perfect for these types of players, considering that it would provide better control over the racket –i.e., changing from forehand grip to backhand grip and vice versa.

Badminton skills such as (1) deception and (2) tumbling net shots require players to have great control over their rackets and have excellent wrist action.
Therefore, it's not recommended for stroke/rally players to hold their rackets too tightly.
This may lead to too much power in their shots especially when they're performing advanced skills. Total control over power is important in this type of play.



HOW TO CHOOSE THE BEST GRIP


CONTROL GAME
Skills = Clears, Drops, Net Shots, Deceptions
Grip Size = THINNER grips so that your fingers are more flexible to move and you will have a better badminton grip technique.
Grip Weight = If you want more control, the racket handle should be HEAVIER than its racket head.


POWER GAME
Skills = Smash, Jump Smash, Drives
Grip Size = THICKER grips so that it will be easier for you to hold tightly to your badminton racket when doing strong smashes.
Grip Weight = If you want more power, the racket head should be HEAVIER than its racket handle (this gives more momentum in a swing).



THICKER GRIP (+/-)
Thicker grip makes things more comfortable and reduces the potency of arm strain/injury.
Thicker grip is suited towards an arm-based player, but can also help stopping tennis elbow injury.
The thicker the grip causes the overall weight slightly more Head-Light racket.


THINNER GRIP (+/-)
Thinner grip allows you to turn the racquet quicker and potentially generate more "snap" power.
Thinner grip is suited towards wrist play and deception tactic.
The thinner the grip causes the overall weight slightly more Head-Heavy racket.
Thinner grips do loose durability quickly, and so you may need to change it more frequently.



Other Relevant Tips
If you cannot get your preferred G4 size, you can use a G5 size and buy a grip tape to wrap your racquet handle so that it will now be about a G4 size. Nevertheless, this would cause your racquet to be slightly heavier and also a little handle heavy.

If you cannot grip tight enough, then the grip is too big for your hand.
If you feel that the racket wants to fly out off your hand, then the grip is too small for your hand.

Heavier Handle = lighter head
Lighter Handle = heavier head

Last edited by Sulistyomo; 23 Sep 2011 at 06:30. Reason: All About Grip Size
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Old 22 Sep 2011, 11:10
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6. Balance Point / Titik Keseimbangan
a. 270-280mm = Head Light (Defensive)
b. 275-285mm = Neutral (All Round)
c. 285-295mm = Head Heavy (Offensive)
d. 295-300mm = Extra Head Heavy (Offensive)


Menentukan jenis raket berdasarkan balance point. Sebenarnya tidak ada aturan baku mengenai nilai balance point dalam menentukan karakteristik jenis raket. Tetapi biasanya yang digunakan:
- Raket tipe Head Heavy : Balance point >29 cm
- Raket tipe Even Balance: Balance point 27 – 29cm
- Raket tipe Head Light: Balance point <27 cm



- HEAD HEAVY
Feel raket akan terasa lebih berat di bagian frame, memberi daya dorong lebih kuat terhadap shuttlecock pada saat melakukan smash yang menukik maupun lob panjang, dengan kompensasi kecepatan gerak/ reaksi raket dan stamina pemain lebih dikorbankan karena raket terasa lebih berat. Cocok digunakan untuk pemain (i) yang mempunyai tenaga pukulan yang kuat / bagus, (ii) yang condong bermain pada permainan tunggal, dan (iii) stamina yang sangat baik.


- HEAD LIGHT
Feel raket akan terasa ringan di bagian frame, raket akan bereaksi dan bergerak lebih cepat, membutuhkan dan mengandalkan kecepatan ayun yang lebih tinggi saat memukul agar menghasilkan speed ball yang baik. Cocok digunakan untuk pemain (i) yang lincah, (ii) yang mengandalkan drive cepat dan defense, (iii) yang condong bermain pada permainan ganda, dan (iv) kekuatan pukulannya tidak terlalu kuat.


- EVEN BALANCE
Feel raket akan terasa cukup berimbang, mempunya daya dorong yang cukup bagus dengan manuver yang cukup baik, karakteristiknya lebih pada kompromi antara Head Heavy dan Head Light. Cocok digunakan oleh pemain (i) yang tipe bermainnya tidak terlalu agresif, dan (ii) pola permainannya cukup seimbang antara penyerangan dan pertahanan.



Informasi Tambahan
Rackets with the same weight could have different weight balance.
A Head Heavy balance means the weight is shifted towards the head.
A Head Light balance means the weight is shifted towards the grip.

A head heavy racket will give you more power due to the momentum generated from the heavier racket head, but less maneuverability.
A head light racket will give you more maneuverability, but less power.

If you tend to smash a lot and do not mind sacrificing a certain extent of maneuverability, then it would be advisable to get a head heavy racket for more power.
If you tend to play more defensive, fast or controlled type of shots, then it would be advisable to get a balanced or head light racket for better maneuverability.


Ada salah kaprah yang berkembang, yang mengatakan bahwa raket head heavy adalah raket serang (attacking racquet). Sebenarnya pendapat ini tidak begitu tepat, karena jika karakteristik permainan anda tidak sesuai, maka menggunakan raket tipe head heavy akan membuat serangan anda less powerful (kurang bertenaga). Semua raket dapat dijadikan attacking racquet apabila ditunjang dengan karakteristik permainan yang sesuai oleh seorang pemain, yang akhirnya akan membuat setiap serangan menjadi sangat powerful.

Sekedar informasi saja, saat ini banyak pabrikan besar dunia pembuat raket berlomba-lomba untuk membuat spesifikasi dan teknologi raket yang tidak lagi mengandalkan pada balance point yang tinggi untuk menghasilkan power. Mereka berusaha dengan semaksimal mungkin membuat raket dengan balance point terendah yang mampu memberikan power yang maksimal.

Meski bukan patokan khusus, bagi para peminat bulutangkis, mungkin sudah saatnya memilih raket yang sesuai dengan kapasitas permainan masing-masing. Karena tiap pemain memiliki kemampuan berbeda. Jadi jangan salah pilih raket, percuma punya raket canggih dengan kualitas teknologi terbaru kalau ternyata tidak sesuai.



Beginner's Note
For beginner, it would be more advisable to get an Even Balance racket to be on the safe side, rather than committing to a head-heavy or head-light bias and later find that it’s not suitable for you. Once you know your characteristics of play, you can always replace your racket with a more suitable one later.

Last edited by Sulistyomo; 22 Sep 2011 at 11:34. Reason: All About Balance Point
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Old 22 Sep 2011, 11:10
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SINGLE vs. DOUBLE

Can anybody tell me whether it is better to use a Head Light or Head Heavy racquet for doubles and singles?

I've heard it is better to use head light for doubles and head heavy for singles since doubles tends to be a much faster game-play. However, I can't help to find that when I use head-light for doubles, I can't seem to generate enough power to smash as hard as my head heavy racquet.



I would definitely agree that Head-Light rackets are more suitable for doubles, whilst Head-Heavy rackets are better for singles:


A) SINGLE - Head Heavy
Singles is predominantly back to back stuff with the odd drop or net dribble exchange, so a head heavy racket can be used without worrying about lots of defense switching; Head heavy racket generates more power but since its head heaviness, your defense tends to be slower.

Majority singles player using head heavy racket because singles matches needs the head heaviness of the racket to generate harder and more accurate smashes. And the likeliness of high numbers of rallies is lesser compare to doubles, hence it is better for those who prefer harder smashes to use head heavy racket.


B) DOUBLE - Head Light
Generally speaking, in doubles you play faster rallies with more drives and smashes, and hence would prefer a head lighter racquet to drive back or defend.

Doubles calls for the full variety of shots, so a head light racket, while perhaps sacrificing a little bit of power, can cover every base. Furthermore, a Headlight racket also allows faster responsiveness.

Last edited by Sulistyomo; 25 Sep 2011 at 00:36. Reason: Single-Double Racquet vs. Double-Games Racquet
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Old 22 Sep 2011, 11:40
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Should there be any inaccuracy and/or confusion to any of the aforementioned conclusion, please do not hesitate to put your opinion to this thread.

Thanks!
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Old 24 Sep 2011, 01:58
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Thanks for the summary, bro :d
We really appreciate it.
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Old 24 Sep 2011, 14:49
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Very very good info 4 us especially newbie2 badminton Hihihihi :)
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Old 03 Jul 2012, 22:16
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Suhu Sulis, any idea when should I change some kind of our raquet spesification in accordance to the transition on my skill level development?
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Old 03 Jul 2012, 23:56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetspot View Post
Suhu Sulis, any idea when should I change some kind of our raquet spesification in accordance to the transition on my skill level development?

Why would you want to change the racquet if you feel that its specification match with your playing-style ?

Every year, badminton vendors, release and update their new products. Some of these new products would have similar specification with our current racquet.

In this matter, usually, we always be tempted to try (or to acquire) this new products. Nevertheless, every players reserve their own discretion in choosing the racquet, which they feel comfortable to use with. If the new equipment does not really complied with the players' playing style, then they could always opt to return using their old racquet.

IMHO - it would be more advisable for you to increase the string's tension, in order to match your skill's development, rather than changing your raccquet.

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Old 28 Jul 2012, 11:00
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Yupz..I have choose for devensife in double typical racket
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Old 10 Aug 2012, 20:45
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thx for the info..very usefull

Last edited by kevin51; 28 Aug 2012 at 07:27.
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Old 22 Sep 2012, 05:27
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Link Source = http://www.badmintoncentral.com/foru...dminton-Racket













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Old 22 Sep 2012, 10:34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetspot View Post
Suhu Sulis, any idea when should I change some kind of our raquet spesification in accordance to the transition on my skill level development?
What if there's no development? Should I replace my hand instead?
__________________
Badminton itu cadas jendral!!!
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Old 22 Sep 2012, 12:31
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Memang boss satu ini kagak ada matinye....
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Old 23 Sep 2012, 02:37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by simujur View Post
Memang boss satu ini kagak ada matinye....
hahahaha... brother simujur

there are lots of other master in this forum who are lots better above me
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Old 06 Oct 2012, 02:07
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Default Understanding BALANCE POINTS

Link - http://www.badmintoncentral.com/foru...67#post1979367


I just found out a comprehensive article containing Balance Point of a racquet




Over the years I’ve noticed that a lot of people have taken different views over the question of balance point and have confused balance point with racquet weight. So I’ve tried to put together a few of my thoughts down and try to explain my take on it and hopefully clarify this important racquet property (I got a little carried away and wrote a little too much in the end!).


Balance point (BP) is basically the position of the centre of mass of the racquet, measured from the butt of the racquet handle.
This gives some indication as to whether it is deemed head heavy, head light or even balanced in its original state.



The overall length of modern racquets are generally around 665mm - 675mm but with most racquets now at the longer length of 675mm, here are my suggested BPs for these racquets.

Head Heavy (HH) > ~295mm
Even Balanced (EB) = ~285-295mm
Head Light (HL) < ~285mm



Obviously, this is just for guidance, in reality the classification is never as clear cut as this. For example, some may regard 300mm is still even balanced but at the higher end of the EB scale or <280mm to be considered HL. It is quite subjective.


The weight of a racquet is not the same as the balance. The weighting of racquets are generally in increments of 5g less than 100 grams and a racquet of any weight can have different balances. However a HH “U” weighted racquet and a HL “4U” racquet may be difficult to play with.

U: 95g
2U: 90g
3U: 85g
4U: 80g




We mostly feel the effects of a racquet’s balance through the weakest component of our stroke, our wrist/hand. Although it can affect the elbow, shoulder etc, we are more sensitive to its balance in our wrist/hand and in particular strokes that use predominately the wrist such as BH/FH drives, flick serves, BH net kill etc etc...

In other strokes such as a ForeHand clear/smash, that reliance on the wrist is reduced so we tend not to be affected by racquet balance as much, but is more a case of adjusting the timing of the stroke.



The conventional way of determining a racquet’s balance is to find the distance of its centre of mass from the butt end of the racquet. Indeed this is the way racquet manufacturers would determine the balance.

However there are some limitations to this method, as follows=

1.It is only applicable to a racquet that is not modified or altered from the original specification in any way.

2.It is a static test method.




Badminton racquets are seldom kept to the original specification throughout its life. Whether this is through replacing grips, grommets, enlarging the handle, adding weights, using different type/gauge strings etc. All these “changes” would affect the balance point of the racquet to some extent and may change its weight class (U’s).



The drawback with a static test, is that it does not take into account the aerodynamic effects of the racquet.

A head light racquet with poor aerodynamics that generates greater air resistance may hinder its ability to manoeuvre quickly and conversely, a head heavy racquet with good aerodynamics will improve its manoeuvrability to some extent. Given that most of us don’t have a wind tunnel, this factor is usually neglected but it does show that balance point is not the only consideration.


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